[66]  The report mentions William of Orange and Mary II as ‘unknown Lilliputians,’ because the word ‘Lilliputian’ means in Lilliputian ‘Human being’.

      William of Orange (1650–1702) and Mary II (1662–1694) were cousins and protestants.

      Their marriage was intended to keep England, Scotland and Ireland under the clutches of the family.

      Marry II cried for almost two days when she heard she was to marry William. The reason might be that he was 11 years her senior. But it’s also likely, judging by the passionate letters she sent to one Frances Apsley, that she might have preferred the company of women.

      William, on the other hand, was faithful to his mistress, Elizabeth Villiers.

      On the farthing, though, William and Mary are depicted quite content with each other.

The likeness of Mary's lover, Lady Frances Apsley.
Artist: John Hayls (1600–1679)
And of Elizabeth Hamilton, mistress of William.
Artist: Unknown

Would you marry for money?

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